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Yang Fudon at Capo d’Arte, Gagliano del Capo

by mousse

August 22~2014

From its special observation point, its position de finibus terrae (“the End of the Land”), Capo d’Arte 2014 is renewed, looking on unknown art worlds and makes the exploration of art scenes in other continents its target for the future.

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Yung Jake “New” at Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles

by mousse

August 21~2014

Steve Turner Contemporary is pleased to present “New”, a solo exhibition featuring sculpture by Los Angeles-based artist Yung Jake.

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“Clear” at Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills

by mousse

August 21~2014

“I was no longer in the water but rather I was high above the water and looking down upon it. The sky, that had been so grey and lowering, was iridescent with indescribable beauty. Waves of ecstatic and delicate color vibrated around me and lulled me to a sense of peace beyond comprehensions.” —Case No. 562—Robert Kyle Beggs. Case-Book of Astral Projection, 545-746, by Dr. Robert Crookall, 1972

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Otto Piene “More Sky” at DeutscheBank Kunsthalle and “The Proliferation of the Sun” at Neue Nationalgalerie and Berlin

by mousse

August 21~2014

The Nationalgalerie and Deutsche Bank KunstHalle dedicate three spectacular projects in Berlin to the artist Otto Piene: an exhibition of the visionary early work (Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, July 17 – August 31, 2014); a new presentation of the seminal slide work “The Proliferation of the Sun” (Neue Nationalgalerie, July 17 – August 31, 2014); and a Sky Art Event on July 19 in the outdoor area of the Neue Nationalgalerie mark the beginning of the Berlin art summer with Otto Piene.

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If Money Talks, What Language Does It Speak?

by mousse

August 20~2014

#OneMoreTime

Jimmie Durham has an interesting theory about money (and about art aimed at making money). Basically, he asks: are we sure that the abominable, rapacious way that part of the world behaves with the rest of the world is the result of human nature? isn’t it likely instead that this ineluctable greed is the nature of money that has infiltrated and infected the nature of humanity? A broad, all-embracing strategy that moves from weighty issues to the marketing ploys of Ronald McDonald—an amorphous, emotionless creature—who has won children over to his side.

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Jimmie Durham: Waiting To Be Interrupted. Selected Writings 1993-2012

by mousse

August 20~2014

Jean Fisher, ed.
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Durham’s primary format is storytelling, central to which is the ability to communicate experience. Edited by Jean Fisher, Selected Writing is the second, long-awaited collection of the artist’s texts, produced and released in a twenty-year span. If the forms of address in the texts aim for simplicity, the use of language—peppered with puns and neologisms and digressions into multilingual etymologies—demonstrates a complexity that persistently defers our demand for easy interpretation. As Durham frequently implies, his subversion of textual logic is intended to liberate words as material from their entrapment in thoughtless conventions (blind belief), just as his play with found materials is intended to free art from its capture in the deathly inertia of monumentalism—its connection to architexture.

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What Do You Need Me For?

by mousse

August 19~2014

#OneMoreTime

There is no denying that the digital revolution has completely transformed the traditional print mediascape in which art criticism had been embedded for centuries, and it has also led to a shift in priorities when it comes to writing critically about art and culture at large. The expansion of art world networks, along with the pressures of social and professional obligations, and the possibility for instant feedback via direct audience interaction and intervention, can lead critics to opt for a more consensus-driven approach to cultural criticism, which de facto accepts and even promotes the notion that making judgments is inherently specious, on a philosophical level, and inherently problematic on a professional one. Writer Vivian Sky Rehberg advocates for independent voices, healthy doses of friction, taking things less personally, in order to encourage a more dynamic and diverse dialogue around our cultural interests. Everyone seems to be talking, but is anybody actually listening?

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“Art or Sound” at Fondazione Prada, Ca’ Corner della Regina, Venice

by mousse

August 18~2014

Fondazione Prada presents “Art or Sound”, curated by Germano Celant, at its Venetian venue, Ca’ Corner della Regina. Conceived as an investigation of past and present times, “Art or Sound” explores the relationship between art and sound and the way it has developed from the 16th century to the present day, examining the iconic aspects of musical instruments, the role of the artist-musician, and the areas in which the visual arts and music have come together.The exhibition sets out to investigate the relationship of symmetry and ambivalence that exists between works of art and sound objects.The intention is to offer a reinterpretation of the musical instrument that turns into a sculptural-visual entity and of the artworks that produce sound, in a continual encroachment and inversion of fields.

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Image Ethics

by mousse

August 17~2014

#OneMoreTime

What does it mean to touch an image, not just to look at it? What are the ethics of the images we choose to touch, those we are allowed to see and those we do not see but know, in fact, to exist? Do the production, storage and circulation of images today imply a responsibility to them and to their care? Curator and writer João Ribas reflects on the task of attending to images and the aesthetic effects they produce, instilling in us a need to store or share them. Arguing that contemporary images force us to move beyond basic aesthetic categories into the realm of the ontology and ethics of new affects, Ribas explores the demands images make today, as well as our forms of iconoclasm and mediation. Do we need to develop ethically informed rather than legally compelled ways to deal with images in our digital condition? Or are we perhaps merely the parasitic hosts of images, which now replicate themselves through us?

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The Man Without Photographs

by mousse

August 16~2014

#OneMoreTime

Photography, at this point, has become the intrinsic and organic container of our lives and our identity. With each new shot our deepest essence inevitably drifts towards the image of our selfies. The psycho-bio-political repercussions are there for all to see. It wasn’t always this way, though. On the way to these and other considerations, Jennifer Allen analyzes the work of Christoph Westermeier, a young artist who concentrates, understandably enough, on the photographic medium. After all, his childhood family album doesn’t exist, since his parents, followers of Heinz Buddemeier—who believed that photographs alter and falsify the memory of our experiences—never took any pictures of their child.

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Jesse Willenbring “Observation Location” at Thomas Duncan Gallery, Los Angeles

by mousse

August 15~2014

Thomas Duncan Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new paintings by Los Angeles-based artist Jesse Willenbring. This is the artist’s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

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Rashid Johnson “Magic Numbers” at The George Economou Collection, Athens

by mousse

August 15~2014

The George Economou Collection is pleased to announce “Magic Numbers”, a solo exhibition by American artist Rashid Johnson (b. Chicago, 1977). Curated by the artist in collaboration with Katherine Brinson, associate curator at the Guggenheim Museum New York, and Skarlet Smatana, director of the Economou Collection, the exhibition features a site-specific installation of works largely conceived on the occasion of the exhibition.

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A Line That Is a Circle

by mousse

August 14~2014

#OneMoreTime

Nicolaus Schafhausen met with Kai Althoff for a friendly conversation that touched on the theme of the influence of the German origins of the artist on his work, and the experiences of the past—including the band Workshop—but also the “melancholy” sensibility of Althoff and the famous episode of the letter to Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev that, as is known, was converted from a personal message to one of the most enigmatic and intimate operations of dOCUMENTA (13).

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Stylometry: Part I

by mousse

August 13~2014

#OneMoreTime

“Stylometry” is the first of a two-part series by artist and programmer, John Menick. Part one investigates the field stylometry—the computational study of writing style as a means to author identification. Drawing on ways of analyzing anonymous or disputed documents, stylometry has legal as well as academic and literary applications, ranging from the question of the authorship of Shakespeare’s works to forensic linguistics.

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Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi: One Season in Hell

by mousse

August 13~2014

Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi, eds.
Preface by Florence Derieux
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In the spring of 2007, in New York, as part of an exhibition organized by Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi produced One Season in Hell, an installation whose point of departure was Arthur Rimbaud’s famous extended poemUne saison en enfer. By using Google’s online translation app to obtain an English version of the original text, Ken Okiishi first of all appropriated it and peppered it with jokes, puns and references to popular culture, from Karl Lagerfeld to South Park by way of the hairstyles of certain Japanese teenagers and Volvo cars. Nick Mauss, for his part, annotated the text, and then drew on it.

 In tandem, the artists then published an eponymous book in which these pages were all brought together, in an edition of 500, which was quickly sold out. From 13 May to 14 August 2011, Nick Mauss presented his very first solo show in an institution at the FRAC Champagne-Ardenne. It was in the wake of this exhibition that Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi expressed their wish to re-issue One Season in Hell, whose outcome both offers us a new way of looking at Rimbaud’s oeuvre and extends their respective praxes in a remarkable way.
Co-published with FRAC Champagne-Ardenne.

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Aurélien Froment “Fröbel Fröbeled” at Spike Island, Bristol

by mousse

August 12~2014

Fröbel Fröbeled is the culmination of French artist Aurélien Froment’s extensive research into German educationalist Friedrich Fröbel (1782–1852), founder of the first Kindergarten. Taking his cue from philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Swiss pedagogue Johan Pestalozzi, Fröbel advocated the direct engagement of children with the world via self-directed activity and play. Throughout his career he developed a series of educational toys (balls of wool, wooden geometric shapes, pattern blocks), which he embedded into an open-ended sequence of objects whereby each shape suggests the next. He called themSpielgaben, literally ‘play gifts’. Though Fröbel’s work was influential and the gifts were widely adopted by educationalists, appreciation of the system’s consistency has been diluted and lost over time. This is the first exhibition to present the sequence in its entirety.

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Techno-animism

by mousse

August 11~2014

#OneMoreTime

Lauren Cornell interviews four artists – John Kelsey, Katja Novitskova, Jacolby Satterwhite and Mark Leckey – about their perception or preoccupation with our relationship with the non-human world. The conversation sets forth from Mark Leckey’s upcoming exhibition “The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things”, which explores techno-animism, and then widens to explore the idea that the capacity of matter to self-organize has generated living things and man, and therefore – in the final analysis – technology, commerce and forms of competition that are “artificial” yet totally attuned to those of the biological world.

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Intimacy

by mousse

August 10~2014

#OneMoreTime

Peter Hujar documented the gaze and way of life of the human universe of a by-now vanished New York, which in the 1970s and 1980s was burning with feverish desire. His protagonists voraciously consumed existence and love under the wings of a night that seemed like it would never end. Stefan Kalmár draws a moving portrait of the man and the photographer who—as Nan Goldin put it—more than any other “had an ability to inhabit another being’s flesh.”

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