Close
Close

EXHIBITIONS

Anna Bella Geiger and Leticia Ramos at Mendes Wood DM, Brussels

Anna Bella Geiger “Circa MMXVIII Human Landscape”

Letter: to Anna Bella Geiger

The art world today is developing like a territory, a domain with unspoken rules and codes. The artist is hereby imperceptibly deployed as the seeming protagonist of an artistic caravan. The direction is unclear, but the caravan is moving, like a turbulent horde. The artist’s oeuvre must preferably be recognizable and cryptically readable. For more than five decades already, Anna Bella Geiger has been an artist who has gone against the caravan, whose artistic approach is driven by experiment and commitment. Rio de Janeiro is her operational setting; the world is the screen against which the work unfolds supremely. Each work by Anna Bella Geiger is like a geological section. Drawing on her personal perspective, the artist engraves and marks the frictions between ideological, geographical, political, and cultural elements. Her work is the result of a consistently critical attitude where an aesthetic ability is always anchored ethically. Anna Bella Geiger acts alertly and uses art as a means to unravel systems of power and control, such as maps and borders, into a formal spectrum. As an artist, Anna Bella Geiger has developed a body of work that takes shape conceptually and tactilely. By this I mean that the artist has appropriated every medium (painting, design, video, assemblage, etc.), offering resistance to the conventions of the day. The work of Anna Bella Geiger is a translation of the artist’s layered identity in an artistic corpus that raises the question of how, as an artist, one can take up a position that can effectively offer an answer to the latent oppression of ideological and other mechanisms. For the artist, the associative stratification of the image is a strategic wager that deconstructs conventions. Anna Bella Geiger is an artist who often uses the contours of a country, Brazil, as a universal reflection and metaphor on the inability to think and act as a human being limitlessly and without borders.

– Philippe Van Cauteren, Sharjah, 26 March 2018

Letícia Ramos “Resistance of a Body”

Letícia Ramos is a photographer-scientist, a traveler through the centuries, revisiting the inventions which changed the way we represent the world. Her work is frequently the result of a long process involving the development of devices and techniques to reach a certain goal, and her photographic images are the material expression of this search, like maps recording a journey. It is not for nothing, many of her photographs appear abstract or coded, challenging everyone with their power to synthesize.

This work refers to the developments of the Industrial Revolution, a period in which the photograph was used to support scientific theses, improve the “workshop of the world” and expand productive capacity. Then we come to the time of Frederick Winslow Taylor (1856-1915), the American engineer who is known for his studies of the movements of British workers so that they could be improved and repeated. The improvement of machinery was the improvement of men.

In 1916, in the best example of Taylorism, the couple Frank and Lillian Gilbreth published the article “The Effect of Motion Study upon the Workers.” The Gilbreths used photography and animation to study work cycles and find out how to make them shorter and more efficient, reducing fatigue. The Gilbreths enthused “Time and motion studies make any activity interesting.” The workers who participate in the studies will be “more efficient, successful and happy.”

To achieve their objective, the Gilbreths combined studies of work movements, timing, standard work elements (“therbligs”), and chronocyclegraphs – photographs of workers’ movements, traced through a trail of light. The photographs were taken by exposing the photographic plate for the duration of the activity and fixing small lightbulbs to the bodies of the workers, so that their light would register the movement of their limbs.

The chronocyclegraphs were a development of pioneering research by Eadweard Muybridge (1830-1904) and Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904). With the appearance of sculptural light spirals, the chronocyclegraphs were curiously in tune with the production of futuristic artists, who also promoted the utopia of man-machine, but did not foresee that scientific positivism could use photography to increase the economic exploitation of the worker.

In A resistência do corpo (Resistance of a Body), Letícia simulates a controlled environment to test the reaction of bodies to what happens during street demonstrations. Cameras, puppets and mannequins mimic the visual repertoire of scientific studies in photos of thrown objects, communication by mobile phones in social networks, and the impact of water jets.

Following the same process as the Gilbreths, Letícia carried out numerous tests. In some images, a head, a bust and a hand caught in something are hit by jets of water, the backlit drops spreading out like the Milky Way. In another image, a doll smashes on the ground, as if it were a living person.

The fragmented bodies, the mechanical devices, the dark background with dots of light, all establish a calculated and mysterious atmosphere, as if we were immersed in a robotic or space experience. The use of photography gives veracity to the work and gives even an unlikely situation a documentary feel when photographed.

Small screens show videos of points of light outlining the motion of a falling body. Why is it falling? Gradually, the work becomes abstract. The image of a message being sent on a cell phone, typed by a hand clothed with a sleeve of balls and photographed with a strobe light, resembles a set of atoms vibrating in space. Another message is sent, registered with a glove dotted with lights and divided into blue images, seeming to show an electric discharge, the same as those that a small Polaroid camera takes. The transparent blue of the images reveals that x-ray plates are being used rather than film – the same plates that medicine uses to investigate the mysteries of the body. Another plate shows a mannequin and a single hand, as if they were making a strange and surreal call for help.

Letícia’s images do not make things clearer. It is possible that the figure throwing the object represents a protester. The person sending the message on the cell phone could be anyone. The water jets could be the responsibility of the police.

How much can a body resist in street demonstrations? Who is interested in these visual representations of impacts? Mannequins and test dummies are frequently used in industry to avoid harming real people, mainly in situations of extreme risk. The videos made by vehicle manufacturers to study the effects of a high velocity impact on bodies are well known. Even though the availability of these images can increase our sense of security, they can also have the opposite effect, diminishing our perception of the risks to which we are subjected, or frightening us through the indirect display of the physical repression to which we are subject.

If we saw the pictures of people affected by car crashes, perhaps we would not support the high velocity industry. Images of weapons and the police, often shown by the authorities to convey a sense of security, also intimidate us. Increases in firepower and more powerful weapons of war have led to an ever-more abstract representation of violence. It is now rare to see photographs from the battle front – they come from drones and satellites.

Indirect representation also dehumanizes, is what the artist appears to say in this dark and disturbing work where photograph is made into a still-life, or almost still.

– Thyago Nogueira, head of Contemporary Photography at Instituto Moreira Salles, Brazil, and editor at ZUM magazine. 

English version: Stephen Rimmer

Project developed with the support of Instituto Moreira Salles. Curated by Thyago Nogueira.

 

 

at Mendes Wood DM, Brussels
until 26 May 2018

Related Articles
EXHIBITIONS
“Museum for Preventive Imagination — EDITORIAL” at MACRO, Rome
(Read more)
EXHIBITIONS
Jana Euler “Unform” at Artists Space, New York
(Read more)
EXHIBITIONS
Jess Mai Walker “Eurodaemons” at ALMANAC INN, Turin
(Read more)
EXHIBITIONS
Kris Lemsalu Malone & Kyp Malone Lemsalu “Love Song Sing Along (Once Again With Feeling!)” at Kai Art Center, Tallinn
(Read more)
EXHIBITIONS
ektor garcia “Oax.D.F.L.A.N.O.H.K.” at Empty Gallery, Hong Kong
(Read more)
EXHIBITIONS
Paul Bonnet “Common Task” at Édouard Montassut, Paris
(Read more)