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EXHIBITIONS

Bradford Hurst Kessler and Alex Rathbone at Valentin, Paris

Bradford Hurst Kessler 

 

1 Behold ye helpless patients inside the city walls! 2 Here within the cold steel and stone the liars of the ancient school dance in divine costumes from which value has been masqueraded in for centuries. 3 Those old gents rhyme with threats, curses, criticism, mockery and create rampant wrath from East to West and North to South. 4 For the fatal fallacies of this faculty and its pallid pupils, a child hast birthed whom floats like a mist above and about these nervous structures. It gathers moss and dirt upon this arid wilderness until the metal master doth sink. What man has made, a child can destroy! 5 Slowly, it shall consume every last person thus resuscitated them from the false folktale they have envisioned. No ideal human standeth sure! 6 For only the involuntary momentum of eating and getting eaten continues the plot of symmetrical digestion in which all species transform from predator to prey and back again. 7 I am forever close by your ear ever reminding you of your deepest of deep decomposing identity impregnated with thoughts, images, memories, regrets, fears, wishes, resolves, all tightly tuned to the constantly evolving mythical pageant of exterior sensations. 8 My sweetest friends, I am more than a hallucination; 9 I live inside each and every one of you, connecting all with earthly necessities. 10 Happy is he whom they frown not, for why bathe in the artificialities of civilization where other’s drama is thy own? 11 Come away from these cities of death! Grab hold of my hand and live more bestial than any beast before. 12 Give up your beds and allow these four-legged creatures to feeleth the life beyond the wild, for the time is such as they requireth comfort. 13 It would mean everything to me and everything I want is every part of you.

-Metropolitan Book of the Dead

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at Valentin, Paris
until 11 March 2017

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Alex Rathbone

 

[…] We’ve all become so conditioned by modern recording techniques and by broadcasting // everybody’s afraid to put a foot wrong. You see, these days, if you’re going to have a record which is going to be played many times then a simple thing which didn’t fit terribly well on one occasion wouldn’t matter, but on repeated hearings ifs going to jar like anything. So, we are all inhibited by recording into playing something which is set and perfect and therefore the element of chance—and after all there is always the chance that things won’t come off—has been neglected. And this is totally at variance with the whole spirit of the baroque. I’m not at all sure that recording is useful for anything more than reference. You have to react to the conditions of the performance the actual circumstances. You play differently in a different hall, the acoustics make a difference. The instrument makes a tremendous difference. You may be feeling more—I don’t know—you may be feeling more worked up on this occasion—you feel something brighter is needed. You go into the music in a kind of—unbuttoned way, and if you play something which doesn’t fit absolutely perfectly, well, it doesn’t matter too much. You’ve really got be on your toes, to be alert to do something which occurs to you which may seen a good idea, and be prepared also to find that it doesn’t absolutely work. But it wouldn’t matter because then the thing is alive, ifs got some vitality in it.

–Musician Lionel Salter (extract from an interview printed in Derek Baileys “Improvisation: its Nature and Practice in Music”)

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at Valentin, Paris
until 11 March 2017

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