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EXHIBITIONS

Dirk Braeckman at Belgian Pavilion, Venice Biennale

Dirk Braeckman’s photographic works bring a stillness to today’s constant ow of images. Using analogue techniques, he has developed a visual language of his own that focuses the act of viewing and re ects on the status of the image. Braeckman explores the boundaries of his medium and challenges photographic conventions. The camera’s ash re ects o the surface of the subject, the texture of walls, curtains, carpets and posters. His images show anonymous subjects from his immediate surroundings, evoking an open story. The artist shows empty rooms in which time seems to stand still, elements of interchangeable interiors or human gures that stand only for presence — all separate from any speci c identity, place, time or emotion.

 

‘I think the Belgian pavilion is the most beautiful of all in Venice. If I could choose just one from the whole of the Giardini, this would be it. I always thought it would be ideal for my work: the light, the scale, the architecture’
–Dirk Braeckman

 

Powerful images

Dirk Braeckman is showing a distilled selection of his work at the recently renovated Belgian Pavilion. The presentation is clean and sober. Eva Wittocx: ‘These are extremely powerful images too: the moment you enter the pavilion, your gaze is pulled towards certain works. Some are hung in pairs or form a series, as they are prints from the same negative. Other works hang on their own and have been given the space to tell their own story, without too much in uence from the images displayed around them.’ The photographs are charged with pent-up tension, yet the exhibition conveys a certain tranquillity.’ The presentation does justice to both the intimacy and the distance that the works suggest. ‘When you hang two works alongside each other, dialogue can suddenly turn into anecdote’, Dirk Braeckman says. ‘That’s something I strictly wanted to avoid. I don’t object to dialogue between my works, but it should be emotional rather than anecdotal.’

 

‘For me, he is one of the most important Belgian artists. He thinks about both the role of art and the place of images today. Braeckman’s work places looking at its heart; it is radical and constantly interrogates itself’
– Eva Wittocx

 

Dirk Braeckman never works with xed themes or series — his oeuvre forms a continuum. Each exhibition shows a cross-section of his artistic practice at that particular time. Eva Wittocx: ‘Braeckman’s artistic practice nevertheless remains recognizable throughout the presentation: the rephotographing of existing images, for instance, and the visualization of interiors, unde ned spaces, the naked body and landscapes.’

 

Slowing down time

‘I use analogue methods, with the darkroom serving as my studio. I need that darkroom process: I find I like to focus more and more on a single image, or rather to continue working on the same one. I don’t want to make one image, then another, then yet another. I prefer to concentrate on a small number of elements and possibilities and to keep working on those. I like to stretch out the time. You can constantly question my images: there are new stories in them every time’
–Dirk Braeckman

The element of slowing, of seeking silence and peace, is embodied not only in the exhibition and the nal works themselves, but also in in the artist’s work process. Braeckman creates his images in the darkroom. Experiment is crucial to both their registration by the camera and their subsequent processing. The exposure, manipulation and development of negative and photographic paper consistently results in new and unique images. Graininess, spots, cropping and attening of perspective resist an immediate reading or interpretation of his work. Over and underexposure and working in grey tones heighten the iconic character of his images.

In July 2016, Dirk Braeckman and Eva Wittocx, Senior Curator of M–Museum Leuven were con rmed as Belgium’s representatives at Venice by the Flemish Minister of Culture, Media, Youth and Brussels, Sven Gatz. M is providing the institutional organization for the show. The exhibition that Dirk Braeckman and Eva Wittocx have compiled for the Belgian Pavilion consists of over twenty monumental works, some in colour, most in shades of grey. Most works are new, complemented by a selection of earlier pieces.

 

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at Belgian Pavilion, Venice Biennale
until 26 November 2017

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